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By Frankie Piliere

Through consultation of some good statistical minds, I believe that I now have a more firm understanding of what our new pitching statistic really is measuring and how it can be applied. Pitches Towards Outs measures a pitchers dominance. Yes, dominance. It sounds bold but that’s what it is I believe.

This is not a measure of best pitchers, although that can often go hand in hand with dominance. Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, etc. are all phenomenal but you are not going to see them go through a lineup without setting up hitters or battling them in deep counts. And, while it’s been suggested that this measurement may work towards indicating a pitcher’s stuff, well it doesn’t quite do that either. A perfect example of why not is if a pitcher is walking hitters and laboring deep into counts to get them out, great stuff or not, they would not do well in this formula.

So, yes, this formula is about ease of outs. The optimal performances are first pitch outs and three pitch strikeouts. If a pitcher went through a game like that, I think you’d call that the essence of “ease of outs” or dominance. Dominance is a little bit up for interpretation so if ease of outs works for you, we can call that this formula’s application. Find out more after the jump…

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by Frankie Piliere

Yes, we do makes posts on Easter Sunday. This post is worth it. Coming off a first-hand scouting report from the Cape Cod League, I wanted to follow up with a study I conducted using the Cape pitchers as my guinea pigs. Is it even sabermetrics or just for statheads? I don’t think so. This involves just some pure analysis and uses a number we don’t always use, perhaps because it isn’t always available. Pitches thrown. We know 100 pitches seems to be the magic number for pitchers these days and we know the difference between a good and a bad strike to ball ratio. They tell us of a pitcher’s a durability or how much a pitcher is laboring. However, what they’ve never told us before, without actually charting every game is where those pitches are being distributed, and more importantly how efficiently the pitcher is using them.

 

There is a stereotype given to strikeout pitchers that says they use more pitches (which they do) and somehow aren’t as efficient as pitchers who pitch to contact. But, have you ever wondered which pitchers achieve their positive outcome (an out in play or a strikeout) in the most efficient manner? Example: A pitcher who struck out every batter he faced on three pitches and induced outs in play on the first pitch would be considered extremely efficient. Obviously that is an extreme example, but you see my point.

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by Frankie Piliere

Both myself and Kiley plan to put some of our raw thoughts and ideas on this blog quite frequently so we hope you enjoy stuff like this beyond all the other forms of analysis. If there are any new ways to look at baseball or any opening to analyze something that hasn’t been analyzed, we’d like to open that window and explore it. It is both our quest and our curse if you know what I mean. This idea/study is one of those thoughts that I’m currently thinking out loud. Any and all feedback is welcome.

Being that I will spend much of this spring and summer trying to locate indy league players who could succeed at the professional level, I recently asked myself a few questions. First, how difficult or challenging are these Independent Leagues in comparison to the minor league levels. What I found by no means represents what I believe to be any direct correlation or law, but I do think it at least carries a little weight.

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